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For Professional Clients and, in Switzerland, for Qualified Investors only. In Israel for Sophisticated Investors only.
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© 2020. BNY Mellon Investment Management EMEA Limited. All rights reserved.
IDEAS AND KNOWLEDGE TO INSPIRE YOUR INVESTMENTS THINKING
1 October 2020

Is inflation a friend or foe?

On 21 August 2020, following an extensive review, Federal Reserve (Fed) Chairman Jerome Powell announced that the central bank would shift to a new policy framework – flexible average inflation targeting. This will see the Fed continue to target inflation at 2%, but over longer periods. In future, if inflation persistently fails to meet the 2% target, it will be allowed to run moderately above target such that inflation averages 2% over time. By making this change, the Federal Open Markets Committee hopes to anchor longer-term inflation expectations.

 

Since the 2% US inflation target was introduced in 2012 by Ben Bernanke (former chair of the US Federal Reserve), inflation as measured by the Personal Consumption Expenditure Price Index has persistently failed to meet that target over time. A considerable gap has grown between the recorded level of prices and the level had inflation met the 2% target.

 

This has led to criticism that pre-emptive tightening of monetary policy to dampen perceived inflationary pressures (that have then failed to materialise in actual price rises) has simply damaged economic growth unnecessarily.

 

The clear message from this change in policy framework is that investors should expect monetary policy to remain at highly stimulative levels for an extended period. Even if inflation were to accelerate from current levels, the Fed would not just tolerate inflation above target – it is actively seeking it.

 

Given the extent of the undershoot in recent years and the level of unemployment, it could be argued that the Fed would now accept quite an extended period of above-target inflation if it materialised. The Fed’s assessment of the Phillips Curve1 has also now radically changed, and it has noted that the maximum level of employment is a “broad-based and inclusive goal”.

 

The benefits of high employment to income inequality now appear to outweigh any concerns that low levels of unemployment will generate wage inflation. In the short-term there seems little reason to fear inflation, with abundant levels of excess capacity following the coronavirus crisis. But many of the disinflationary forces that have held inflation at bay in recent years now appear to be drawing to a close. A future period of above-trend growth may have a very different inflationary outcome and be met by a central bank reluctant to take measures to deal with it.

 

David Hooker, portfolio manager, Insight Investment.

 

1 A.W. Phillips created an economic theory known as the Phillips Curve, which stated that inflation and unemployment have a stable and inverse relationship. If unemployment declines, then the theory suggests that inflation should rise.

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Investment Managers are appointed by BNY Mellon Investment Management EMEA Limited (BNYMIM EMEA), BNY Mellon Fund Management (Luxembourg) S.A. (BNY MFML) or affiliated fund operating companies to undertake portfolio management activities in relation to contracts for products and services entered into by clients with BNYMIM EMEA, BNY MFML or the BNY Mellon funds.

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